(vía hypercards)

hace 1 semana 85 551 notas

vizual-statistix:

Unlike like Emperor Kuzco, I was actually born with an innate sense of direction.  If you’re like me, and you use the Sun to navigate, you probably appreciate cities with gridded street plans that are oriented in the cardinal directions. If you know that your destination is due west, even if you hit a dead end or two, you’ll be able to get there. However, not all urban planners settled on such a simple layout for road networks. For some developers, topography or water may have gotten in the way. Others may not have appreciated the efficiency of the grid. This visualization assesses those road networks by comparing the relative degree to which they are gridded.

To generate the graphic, I first calculated the azimuth of every road in ten counties (plus one parish and D.C.). I tried to choose consolidated city-counties to keep the focus on urban centers, but for larger counties, I opted not to clip the shapefile to the city boundary. All calculations were made in a sinusoidal map projection using the central longitude of the area of interest. I then graphed the angles on rose diagrams (wind roses) using bins of 5° to show relative distributions for each area. The plots were scaled such that the maximum bar height was the same on each rose. To ensure rotational symmetry in the plots, each azimuth was counted twice: once using the original value and once using the opposite direction (e.g., 35° and 215°). As such, all streets, regardless of one-way or two-way traffic, were considered to be pointing in both directions.

The plots reveal some stark trends. Most of the counties considered do conform to a grid pattern. This is particularly pronounced with Chicago, even though much of Cook County is suburban. Denver, Jacksonville, Houston, and Washington, D.C., also have dominant grid patterns that are oriented in the cardinal directions. While Philadelphia and New York are primarily gridded, their orientations are slightly skewed from the traditional N-E-S-W bearings. Manhattan is particularly interesting because it has a notable imbalance between the number of streets running the width of the land (WNW to ESE) and the length of the land (NNE to SSW). New Orleans and San Francisco express some grid-like forms, but have a nontrivial proportion of roads that are rotated in other directions. Downtown Boston has some gridded streets, but the suburban grids are differently aligned, dampening the expression of a single grid on the rose diagram. Finally, the minimal geographic extents of the grids in Charlotte and Honolulu are completely overwhelmed by the winding roads of the suburbs, resulting in plots that show only slight favoritism for certain street orientations.

If you want to see more detail, a full-resolution version of this graphic can be downloaded here:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/my7y24hrzvhagce/Road_Orientation.png

Data source: http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/geo/shapefiles2013/main

Script for azimuth calculation: http://www.ian-ko.com/free/free_arcgis.htm

hace 3 semanas 287 notas

teknari:

Kaws

hace 1 mes 110 notas

velocipedos

my-ear-trumpet:

josephalopod:

Drawing of various antique bicycles, or “velocipedes” as they were then called, from an 1887 German encyclopedia.

"They see rollin’ ; they hatin’"

hace 4 meses 495 notas
25th
Noviembre
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glander:

UH OH!

glander:

UH OH!

(vía cmprtmntlr)

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29th
Octubre
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hace 5 meses 1 368 notas

nolan-kane:

Codex Seraphinianus, 1976-1978

‘The Codex Seraphinianus is a book written and illustrated by Italian artist, architect and industrial designer Luigi Serafini, from 1976 to 1978. The book appears to be a visual encyclopedia of an unknown world, written in one of its languages, an alphabetic writing intended to be meaningless.’

Wikipedia

source

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Octubre
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Octubre
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radrobs:

Codex Seraphinianus by Luigi Serafini, 1981

radrobs:

Codex Seraphinianus by Luigi Serafini, 1981

hace 5 meses 12 notas

drwings:

Nodes and connectors. Family network

hace 6 meses 4 notas
hace 7 meses 6 notas
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Agosto
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15folds:

Anywhere but there

by jack cunningham, Director, London
A man is tortured by the memory of a recent holiday.
Follow the rest of this months ‘Wish You Were Here’ thread at 15Folds.com

15folds:

Anywhere but there
by jack cunningham, Director, London

A man is tortured by the memory of a recent holiday.

Follow the rest of this months ‘Wish You Were Here’ thread at 15Folds.com

hace 8 meses 8 115 notas

collageartburrybuermans:

"Octofish"

50cm x 70 cm

Papercollage from Burry Buermans

http://www.burry.be/

http://www.facebook.com/Burrycollage

(vía fer1972)

hace 8 meses 217 notas

super-graphic:

Reminds me of a Baxter Building cutaway

hace 8 meses 6 notas

IMAGE: Hypnotic GIFs Of A Newly Invented Type Of Hologram

cognitive-geometrics:

image

Artist and scientist Matthew Brand dreamt up specular holography while playing a gig at a Chicago blues club. Of course.

image

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There’s been plenty of oohing and ahhing over the opening of New York’s Museum of Math, and for good reason. It’s remarkable how fun math can be in the hands of the right curator. To wit: The inaugural installation by artist and perceptual scientist Matthew Brand. Brand is the inventor of something called specular holography, a type of optical illusion that tricks your eye into thinking a 2-D object is 3-D.

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At the Museum of Math, 45 of Brand’s specular holograms have been installed on a metal matrix along one gallery wall. Visitors can use an array of overhead lamps to make the looping knots and patterns move as light cascades over the surfaces in multiple directions. Our rods and cones are telling us that we’re seeing a 3-D image. Turns out, we’re seeing 2-D pieces of metal that Brand has engraved with millions of tiny pinpoints, each engineered with its own curvature that reflects light in a specific way.

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Brand calls the process zintaglio, and he discovered it one night after playing a set at a blues club in Chicago. He took off his glasses to rub his eyes, and suddenly noticed that the club’s holiday tinsel produced a different image in each eye. He began trying to prototype metal objects that would take advantage of the effect in a controlled way. “It occurred to me that the optics I wanted should be carved out of metals and plastics, but, it turned out, at the time even high-end CNC machines were not sufficiently fast and precise,” he writes. “However, thanks to Moore’s law, a few years later, that obstacle was gone.” Today, he makes the holograms out of small pieces of metal. Most of the software, he tells Co.Design, “is home-brew with some open-source visualization tools thrown in.”

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Brand has big plans for the specular holography, which represents only part of his far-ranging research on human perception. “Think big holographic surfaces: building facades. Outdoor sculpture. Murals. Art animated by the sun and the motion of people. On towers, doors, windows, walls, ships. In subway and escalator tunnels. Instead of billboards,” he writes. “Anywhere the world needs to be made more interesting.”

Check out more of the holograms on Brand’s website here.

Source: CoDesign

hace 8 meses 12 notas